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Delta CEO gives up seat for struggling mom – TODAY.com

AWESOME!!! What a great guy… Sounds like something C.E. Woolman would have done! Finally, we have a CEO with the true Delta Spirit.

http://www.today.com/travel/delta-ceo-gives-seat-struggling-mom-6C10435416

DELTA NEWSLETTER JUNE 11, 2013


LATEST DELTA CONTACTS:
MORRIS BEREND——–GOOD CONVERSATION ON THE PHONE.
RANCH LAND LOOKING GOOD WHERE DROUGHT  HAS BEEN.
JIM PRESCOTT——ANOTHER LONG PHONE CHAT.  GOING TO FLA. SOON BY CAR.  AFTER THAT FLYING TRIP TO GERMANY.
JOHN WILSON—–SEEN HIM YESTERDAY.  IN SPITE OF HEALTH PROBLEMS HE IS JOLLY EACH TIME I SEE HIM.  GOT A HOUSE FULL OF SOME GOOD ANTIQUES.  HE SAID HIM AND JEFF SCOTT GOT TO THE PIONEERS REUNION SOMETIME BACK.
LEOTIS RATCLIFF——A NAME I HAD NOT HEARD OF IN A VERY LONG TIME.  HE RETIRED FROM DELTA AND WAS WORKING THE TOWER AT THAT TIME.  NOW LIVES IN FRISCO, TEXAS.  WANTS A CONTACT WITH RICHARD PRICE.  I NOT HAVE IT.
THIS HOT WEATHER I HAVE MORE TIME TO MAKE CONTACTS WITH BY CAR, PHONE OR EMAIL.
LAST VISIT OF LAST WEEK WAS A STOP AT SAM BASS’S PLACE. IN SPITE OF MEDICAL CONDITIONS HE ALWAYS HAS A BIG SMILE.  NO COMPUTER. OMAHA STEAKS HAD JUST BEEN THERE AND HE PUT IN GOOD WORD FOR THEM.
G.I. JOE WAS A WWII SONG AND DID NOT KNOW THEY HAD A SON WITH THE OAK RIDGE BOYS.  THAT WAS A GOOD STORY I PUT IN MY LINK.
NEXT WEEK WE HAVE PORT ARTHUR, TEX. KIN PEOPLE COMING AFTER A 60TH H.S. REUNION IN MCALLISTER, OKLA.
YESTERDAY BOMB SCARE WITH SOUTHWEST LANDING IN PHOENIX.  I CERTAINLY HOPE ALL THAT IS NOT GETTING STARTED AGAIN.  AIRLINES HAVE ENOUGH PROBLEMS AS IT IS.
IF ANYONE HAS A CONTACT WITH RICHARD PRICE CONTACT LEOTIS RATCLIFF AT:
SINCE LIGHT TRAVELS FASTER THAN SOUND, SOME PEOPLE APPEAR BRIGHT UNTIL YOU HEAR THEM SPEAK.
WAR DOES NOT DETERMINE WHO IS RIGHT-ONLY WHO IS LEFT.
BUSES STOP IN BUS STATIONS. TRAINS STOP IN TRAIN STATIONS.  ON MY DESK IS A WORK STATION.
DELTA  VAN
                         SAYONARA

Norman Vanlaningham

DELTA AIRLINES NEWSLETTER FOR IAH AND DFW


NOT MUCH NEWS HAS COME IN SINCE THE LAST NEWSLETTER WRITTEN.  GLAD TO REPORT MRS. CAPT. BOB BRYANT IS BACK HOME AT THE RANCH IN CROCKETT, TEXAS.  LONG TERM MEDICAL TREATMENT PAST SEVERAL MONTHS FOR GRACIE.
WAYNE KUEHLER HAS MOVED FROM ARIZONA BACK TO COLORADO.  I THINK MANY FIND OUT THE ARIZONA HEAT IS HARDER TO ADAPT TO THAN YOUNGER DAYS.
IN REPORTS OF CRUISES IT SEEMS THERE IS MORE REPEATS IN THE ONE THAT GOES TO ALASKA THAN ANY OTHERS.
JUNE IS A GREAT TIME TO GO BUT WHAT DO YOU DO WHEN YOU GET BACK TO TEXAS?  I FOR ONE DEALING WITH HEAT IS SOMETHING ELSE.
AT THIS TIME MOWING WORK IS VERY LIMITED AND WILL BE THAT WAY FOR SOMETIME.  FALL IS ALONG WAYS OFF.
DO I EVER GET LOST????  SURE DO. NOT ABLE TO FIND MIKE HAMMER SINCE THE NEW HIGHWAY GOES THROUGH GRAND PRAIRIE.
STILL SAYING SOMEBODY HAS TO KNOW WHERE BILL WALLACE IS.
FINDING SOMEONE HAS ALWAYS BEEN A HOBBY BUT KEEPING A CONTACT IS HARDER ALL THE TIME.
GOOD VISIT WITH RODNEY BURNS WHO HAS JUST GOTTEN BACK FROM NEW ORLEANS.
CHARLEY APPLE AND I HAVE BEEN WANTING TO TAKE A TRIP INTO THE COUNTRY.  PROBABLY DOWN TO MELVIN DECROSS RANCH.  DOWN TO THERE AND BACK WOULD BE 250 MILES.
MOST MOWING JOBS ARE STILL FORECLOSURES.  NEVER SEEMS TO BE A END TO THIS SERIOUS MATTER.
STILL LIKE TO TAKE DRIVES TO SEE HOUSES AS BIG AS A COURT HOUSE.  STILL THE OLD THINKING IF GIVEN TO ME I COULD ONLY AFFORD TO KEEP IT 24 HOURS. THINK ABOUT IT AS THERE  ARE 3 FACTORS.  TAXES,
INSURANCE AND UTILITES.  THEY ARE A FAR CRY FROM ABE LINCOLNS CABIN.
SOON WILL HAVE A REPORT FROM DICK MUARRYS AFRICA SAFARIE.
THE ILL LIST STILL HAS JOE REYNOLDS AND GERALD SANDEN ON IT.  PHONE NUMBER ON REQUEST FOR THOSE THAT WANT IT.
YOU HAVE REACHED MIDDLE  AGE WHEN ALL YOU EXERCISE IS CAUTION.
LIFE IS LIKE A ONION:YOU PEEL IT OFF ONE LAYER AT A TIME, AND SOMETIMES YOU WEEP.
DELTA  VAN
(FT. WORTH, TEXAS WHERE THE WEST BEGINS)

Delta & Industry news – April, 2013

April 23, 2013

 

Dear Delta Retirement Plan Participants:

 

Recently, I’ve seen some exchanges among retirees in which the funded status of Delta’s pension plans has been discussed. These discussions stem from an article published a year ago (April 2012) in Pensions & Investments magazine in which the Delta pension plans are

noted as having the worst funded ratio of any corporate plan in America. Several retirees I know have asked me to comment on these exchanges.

 

For us, the alternative to being the worst funded plan in America is even worse. Why? Because the alternative is that we would have terminated the plans in bankruptcy. What we all achieved by working together in successfully lobbying Congress back in 2006 was the

ability to maintain our plans by stretching our funding out over a much longer time period than other companies are allowed and by using the plan’s historical rate of return to measure liabilities as permitted under prior law. If we had not gotten this relief from Congress, there is no doubt at all that we would have terminated the Delta Retirement Plan (just like we did with the Delta Pilots Retirement Plan). Northwest would have done the same with all its plans during its bankruptcy too, if not for that relief.

 

Having gotten that relief though, it now makes absolute sense that we show up as the worst funded plan out there. In very simplified terms, you can think of it this way. Back in 2007 when the Congressional funding relief went into effect, we were allowed 17 years to

contribute to the Plan what was due, while other companies were allowed seven years to do the same. So for every $100 in liability owed, other companies had to put in about $14.28 per year while we only had to put in $5.88 per year. We are not putting in as much per

dollar of liability as other companies are, so our funded level looks worse than theirs does.  This is no secret and it was to be expected from the moment we got the relief we all sought.

 

This would have been the case whether we merged with Northwest or not and is primarily a function of how fast we are having to make up the shortfall. It is not an indication of lack of commitment to funding these plans. In fact, just recently, we completed funding all of 2013’s $650 million in required contributions well ahead of the designated schedule so that those assets can get into the plan more quickly.

 

Sincerely,

Rob Kight

Vice President – Compensation, Benefits & Services


How airlines recycle materials into goods Airlines recycle used textiles and other materials in creative ways. In the U.S., Tierra Ideas recycles Delta Air Lines curtains and seat covers into bags and wallets, while Desso Aviation weaves KLM’s old uniforms into new carpet for the carrier and Finnair donates used airline seats to emergency vehicles for the Finnish Red Cross. CNN (4/26)


Delta Air Lines boosts CEO pay 42 percent

The CEO of Delta Air Lines saw his compensation jump 42 percent last year as the airline boosted his long-term incentive pay and the airline made more money than its peers.
Richard Anderson’s compensation rose to almost $12.6 million, up from $8.9 million in 2011, according to an Associated Press calculation based on an SEC filing Tuesday.
His pay is divided between cash and stock and options that will only have value if Delta’s stock price rises.
Delta paid Anderson $2.7 million in cash as part of an annual incentive plan, up from about $1 million a year earlier. It also added $2 million worth of stock options in 2012.
Delta awarded him $7 million in stock in both years.
His base salary rose 9 percent to $652,083. Delta said it was Anderson’s first base salary increase since he joined the company as CEO in 2007.
Delta had a $1 billion profit last year. It has been more profitable than its chief competitors — United Continental Holdings Inc., which lost $723 million last year, and American Airlines, which spent the year reorganizing under bankruptcy protection.
Delta shares rose 47 percent last year as its finances improved. The stock also benefited from the growing investor view that airlines aren’t as risky as they used to be, and that they will be helped by consolidation in the industry, including the merger of US Airways and American announced in February.
The Associated Press formula calculates an executive’s total compensation during the last fiscal year by adding salary, bonuses, perks, above-market interest that the company pays on deferred compensation and the estimated value of stock and stock options awarded during the year. The AP formula does not count changes in the present value of pension benefits. That makes the AP total slightly different in most cases from the total reported by companies to the Securities and Exchange Commission.
The value that a company assigned to an executive’s stock and option awards for 2012 was the present value of what the company expected the awards to be worth to the executive over time. Companies use one of several formulas to calculate that value. However, the number is just an estimate, and what an executive ultimately receives will depend on the performance of the company’s stock in the years after the awards are granted. Most stock compensation programs require an executive to wait a specified amount of time to receive shares or exercise options.

10 things you can still ask for on a plane   

From shrinking seats to ever-dwindling in-flight amenities, the airline industry really earns its tight-fisted reputation. But if you know what to ask for, you’ll find that in-flight offerings are not quite as stingy as they seem. We asked author and former flight attendant Beth Blair for her tips on the free extras and services only available to those who know to ask.
So next time you’re hit with a headache onboard or have a thirst that’s going to take more than a glorified Dixie cup of soda to quench, you can ask for—and most likely receive—a little onboard assistance.
Wing pins for kids
Most airlines have cut free food and snacks for adults and kids, but many still offer little flyers wing pins to commemorate their flight. According to Blair, “The pilots usually don’t have them though; it’s the flight attendants who have them stashed somewhere in the cabin.” Can you ask for a pin even if you don’t have kids in tow? We don’t know, but if you’ve tried, leave a comment letting us know how it went!
The whole can
When you factor in the pile of ice that flight attendants load into those little plastic airline cups, you’ll find you’re not getting much liquid on each pass of the beverage cart. If you’ve got a thirst that’s going to take more than a few tablespoons of soda to quench, consider politely asking your flight attendant for the whole can. Blair says that most of the time, they’re happy to oblige. And if they can’t—for instance, because the plane is low on cans or isn’t getting restocked in the next city—flight attendants will still usually offer to simply come by again to refill your cup.
Water-bottle refills
As long as onboard supplies allow it, flight attendants are usually willing to refill your empty bottle of water for you. Blair says, “Most flight attendants are very generous with beverages.” Since passengers who carry their own water bottles will have had to empty them before going through security at the airport, this added service can come in extra handy for the hydration-conscious.
Seconds
Did the bag of tiny pretzels leave you peckish? If you’re flying an airline with free snacks or meals, you can ask for seconds. If, after all passengers are served, there’s extra, flight attendants are likely to grant your request. Blair says flight departure times can help you predict the likelihood of there being extra food: “On some flights it seems nearly all of the passengers pass on meals or snacks (such as late at night). Those flights are the best bet for getting seconds.”
Basic medicines and bandages
Whether it’s for a headache from takeoff or lingering airport heartburn, many flights are stocked with basic medications such as painkillers and antacids. Blair says that, most of the time, flight attendants also have bandages on hand for minor cuts and that “if you’re hurt, flight attendants are experts at making ice packs for injuries (either out of plastic bags or sick sacks).” Knowing this makes us wish flight attendants got merit badges. (Editor’s note: Some airlines may not allow their flight attendants to dispense over-the-counter medications. But if you need one, it never hurts to ask.)
Help finding a doctor
Almost all airlines train cabin crew to ask for medical assistance onboard, so if you’ve got a personal medical emergency, a flight attendant will be your best bet for quickly finding a doctor in-flight. On most airlines, that means the flight attendant will make an announcement over the loudspeaker, but Lufthansa has a program which gives doctors frequent-flyer miles for identifying themselves to the airline in advance.
Help switching seats
Have a seat assignment that’s got you sitting far from a travel companion? Flight attendants are often willing to help negotiate seat switches so you can sit together. They can help as long as there’s time, says Blair, so if you’re going to ask for help, do it soon after boarding. They may ask you to wait until everyone has taken their seats (or until you’re at cruising altitude), but it’s better to have your polite request on their radar for whenever they have a second.
Short-term babysitting
Parents flying alone with infants and small children have bladders too, and, happily, flight attendants are often more than willing to watch a baby or child for a few minutes while a parent runs to the bathroom or stretches his or her legs. “Watching babies was one of my favorite things to do in-flight,” says Blair. “For safety reasons, most airlines ask flight attendants to sit in the aisle passenger seat so they’re not standing and holding a baby.”
Cockpit tours
It may seem incredible given the concern about cockpit security, but if you ask, many pilots are more than willing to give mini cockpit tours before or after the flight. The best time for a visit is usually after a flight has landed, since that’s when pilots tend not to be as rushed. Blair says, “Pilots love to get visitors, especially wide-eyed children. It makes their day to have the chance to show off their ‘office.'”
Sanitizing wipes
The stream of passengers passing through planes each day turns tray tables, armrests, and entertainment-system buttons into germ factories. If you’d like to clean your area before settling in, ask a flight attendant for a few sanitizing wipes; they often have them on hand, though it’s not something most passengers know they can ask for.


Pinnacle Airlines becomes subsidiary of Delta Pinnacle Airlines emerged from bankruptcy on Wednesday as a subsidiary of Delta Air Lines. Pinnacle also plans to move its headquarters from Memphis, Tenn., to Minnesota this month. As part of the deal, Delta invested $52 million into Pinnacle. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (5/1)


Delta unveils preview of high-tech airport lounge Delta Air Lines is offering a preview of its lounge under construction at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The carrier has created a replica of the high-tech lounge in a building in Lower Manhattan. “Whatever a 21st century passenger needs, it’s there,” said Gail Grimmett, Delta’s senior vice president New York. Daily News (New York) (4/30)

DALRC & RAP, Inc. Spring 2013 Newsletter & 2012 Annual Report

DALRC
DALRC & RAP, Inc.
March 21, 2013
Please click on the link below to view the DALRC & RAP Newsletter for Spring 2013 & Our Annual Report for 2012. Thanks for your continuing support of DALRC & RAP.

DALRC Newsletter Spring 2013/Annual Report 2012

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3 TOPICS OF INTEREST TO AIRLINE FOLKS

 

BusinessElite gets Heavenly bed comforter and pillows Delta announced today that it is transforming the onboard sleep experience by offering Westin Heavenly In-Flight bedding that has been designed and manufactured exclusively for Delta. The plush materials will be in all BusinessElite cabins throughout the world beginning in June 2013. “Delta is committed to providing our customers with the best possible sleep experience in the skies and we’re excited to partner with another leader in the travel category, Westin Hotels and Resorts, who shares this goal,” said Joanne Smith, s.v.p.–In-Flight Service. The Westin Heavenly In-Flight bedding includes a Westin Heavenly sleeping pillow and a high thread count comforter with extra-luxurious loft, as well as a lumbar pillow on flights longer than 12 hours. Read more on Delta News Network.

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Res honors top sellers during Summit Club retreat Reservation Sales leaders hosted the 2012 top-selling representatives on the Caribbean island of St. Kitts last week as part of the division’s annual Summit Club recognition event. About 240 representatives attended this year’s event representing the top 10 percent of the more than 5,000 Res employees. The group included 179 millionaires, those who sold more than $1 million in revenue, 17 $2 million sellers, and two $3 million sellers. This year’s Summit Club members made up a cumulative 2,207 years of service with Delta. The group members had a sales rate that averaged 30 percent higher than their peers and were responsible for an average of 244 more vendor transfers than the rest of the Res group. Read more on DNN
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B-787 !!!

The guy who wrote the following is retired from Boeing. Thought you might find it interesting…… sorta “insider stuff”……
For one thing the problem may not be with the batteries themselves, but with the control system that keeps the charge on them at a given level. And the ‘battery problem” is just one problem in many. Last week I had my regular monthly lunch with 5 fellow Boeing engineers (all but one retired) and we talked at length about what we call the “nightmare liner”. We all agreed we will not book a flight on one. The one engineer still working (at age 74) says the news from inside is not good, and that there are no quick fixes for the multitude of problems that the 787 has.
The disaster began with the merger with McDonnell-Douglas in the mid 90s. The M-D people completely took over the Board and installed their own people. They had no experience with commercial airplanes, having done only”cost-plus” military contracting; and there are worlds of difference between military and commercial airplane design.
Alan Mulally, a life-long Boeing guy and President of Boeing Commercial Division was against outsourcing. But instead of making him CEO after he almost single-handedly saved the company in the early 90s, the Board brought in Harry Stonecipher from McDonnell-Douglas, who was big on outsourcing. Stonecipher was later fired for ethics violations. Then the Board brought in Jim McNerney, a glorified scotch tape salesman from 3M and big proponent of outsourcing, to develop the 787. (Alan Mulally left to become CEO of Ford and completely rejuvenated that company.)
McNerney and his bean-counting MBAs thought that instead of developing the 787 in-house for about $11 billion, they could outsource the design and building of the airplane for about $6 billion. Right now they are at $23 billion and counting, three years behind in deliveries, with a grounded fleet. That’s typical for military contracting, so McNerney and the Board probably think they are doing just fine. But it will destroy Boeing’s commercial business in the same way McDonnell wrecked Douglas when they took over that company decades ago.
Boeing had a wonderfully experienced team of designers and builders who had successfully created the 707, 727, 737, 747, 757, 767, and 777 in-house, always on-time, and mostly within budget, and with few problems at introduction. That team is gone, either retired or employed elsewhere. (I took early retirement after the McD takeover of Boeing because I knew the new upper management team was clueless.)
The 787 was designed in Russia, India, Japan, and Italy. The majority of the airplane is built outside the US in parts and shipped to Seattle or Charleston for assembly.
Gee, what could possibly go wrong? Answer: just about everything. Because the M-D people that now run Boeing don’t believe in R&D, the structure of the airplane will be tested “in service.”
Commercial airplanes in their lifetime typically make ten times as many flights and fly ten times as many flight hours as military airplanes, so the argument that composite structure has been “tested” because of the experience of composite military airplanes is just so much BS. So structure is a big issue. The 787 is very overweight. The all-electric controls have the same lack-of-experience issue that the structure has.
The good news for me is that the Boeing pension plan is currently fully funded, although it may not stay that way as the 787 catastrophe develops **************** Thx Larry***********

Delta & Industry news

Starwood Hotels and Delta Air Lines team for VIP perks program A new partnership between Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide and Delta Air Lines will allow their elite customers to link their Starwood Preferred Guest and Delta SkyMiles accounts for access to VIP perks from both programs. The “Crossover Rewards” program is scheduled to launch March 1, with enrollment set to begin Feb. 27. USA Today/Hotel Check-in blog (2/7)


Which airplane business seats are worth the price? Worth magazine has unveiled its “Top 10 Seats in Business Class.” Emirates, Cathay Pacific Airways, Air France, Delta Air Lines and Virgin Atlantic Airways are some of the carriers with business-class seats that made the list. Luxury Travel Magazine online (2/12)


Delta plans $175M project at JFK airport Delta Air Lines plans to expand its presence at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The carrier will undertake a $175 million project at Terminal 4’s Concourse B. In addition, Delta will spend $5 million to enhance its information technology. The Wall Street Journal/Dow Jones Newswires (2/11)


Majority of travelers oppose in-flight cellphone calls, survey says About 60% of travelers responding to a Delta Air Lines survey oppose allowing cellphone calls or videoconferencing while onboard flights. However, most travelers said they support the use of in-flight smartphones for text messaging and entertainment. Roll Call (free content) (2/11)


Delta files lawsuit against Export-Import Bank Delta Air Lines filed a lawsuit against the Export-Import Bank of the United States over loan guarantees provided to foreign airlines for purchasing aircraft manufactured by U.S. companies. Delta’s suit says the bank’s economic analyses run afoul of a law passed by Congress last year. Reuters (2/13)


[From  reader JM:] I wanted to get this off my chest.  I just flew back from Cancun on Delta. Great service with a smile—I was impressed. However there was lots of coughing going on– I felt surrounded by a coven of coughers.

I arrived back home at 5:30 pm, went to bed and then woke at 4 am with a sore throat—and a cold coming on.  As always, I hit the cold hard with zinc lozenges, anti-inflammatories, lots of rest immediately, Vicks on the bottom of my feet, chicken soup, etc. I’m glad to say that I am pretty much over it, fortunately.

But…I found it curious that the flight attendants (for their own health, if not the passengers) don’t announce something like this during cold and flu season:

“If you have a cough, as a courtesy to those around you over the duration of the flight:  cover your mouth, cough into your elbow or your collar, not your hands.”

Maybe they could sell cough drops—or even give them away to ill-prepared passengers. Maybe pass out handkerchiefs for people to cough or sneeze into? The effort would be well worth the trouble and expense, and build goodwill for the airline.  If I had cough drops, I would have given them out gladly.

For everyone’s ears and nerves, don’t you think this is a concern, especially now that the flu epidemic seems to be escalating? I’m curious to know if this has ever been addressed. Would love to have some flight attendants weigh in. OK, I’m done with my rant. 


Delta supports recent American Airlines-US Airways merger Delta Air Lines supports industry consolidation, including the American Airlines-US Airways merger. “We’re happy for the [American-US Airways] merger,” said Allison Ausband, vice president of reservations sales and customer care at Delta. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (2/15)

Column: High cost of jet fuel spurs airline mergers Columnist Kevin Quon says the rising cost of jet fuel is one reason airlines continue to look for savings through mergers. “[A]irline companies spent $48 billion on jet fuel for domestic and international travel in 2011,” writes Quon. “These prices now amount to 35 percent of an airline’s operating cost compared to 10 percent back in 2001.” Seeking Alpha (2/15)


Delta will revamp regional connections at N.Y. airport Delta Air Lines plans to open 11 new gates for regional connections as part of its upgrade to Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. The new gates will allow travelers to connect to regional flights without traveling to Terminal 2. Australian Business Traveller (2/21)


A4A: U.S. airlines earned 21 cents per passenger in 2012 The 10 largest U.S. airlines that have announced 2012 results earned a profit of $152 million, or 21 cents per passenger, for the year after facing high fuel costs. John Heimlich, chief economist for Airlines for America, said U.S. carriers are “setting up a foundation for a structurally more healthy industry.” Los Angeles Times (tiered subscription model)/Money & Co. blog (2/21), MSN Money/The Associated Press (2/21), Air Transport World (2/21)


Delta refinery turns to N.D. crude oil to save costs Delta Air Lines is turning to domestic crude oil from North Dakota rather than foreign crude oil to save costs at its refinery in Trainer, Pa. “More and more, U.S. companies and East Coast refineries are turning to North Dakota’s burgeoning energy industry as a solution for cost savings and saving jobs,” said N.D. Gov. Jack Dalrymple. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (2/21)


Airlines push price increases for business-travel tickets Delta Air Lines has begun the airline industry’s fourth attempt this year to raise ticket prices, increasing its airfares for domestic trips purchased within seven days of the flight by up to $10 per round trip. The price increase, directed at business travelers, has been matched by several carriers. Southwest Airlines is among those raising fares. USA Today (2/21)


Delta expands dining, entertainment on N.Y.-to-Calif. flights Delta Air Lines is featuring more dining and entertainment options onboard flights between New York and California. “We are always working to make the coast-to-coast travel experience more comfortable and productive for our customers,” said Joanne Smith, Delta’s senior vice president of in-flight services. TravelPulse (2/24)


Why airlines might finally lift the ban on electronics
40 percent of us don’t even bother to turn our phones off before takeoff and landing, anyway
By The Week Staff | February 16, 2013
Why is there a ban in the first place? The airline industry and the Federal Aviation Administration worry that electromagnetic waves emitted by passengers’ personal electronic devices — including MP3 players, laptops, tablets, and cellphones — could interfere with an aircraft’s electronic controls, or avionics. Commercial pilots file dozens of reports every year detailing how their radios, GPS navigation systems, and collision-avoidance boxes suddenly went haywire, but began functioning again when passengers were asked to check that all their devices were turned off. That kind of circumstantial evidence led the FAA in 1993 to urge that laptops, audio players, and other electronic distractions not be used during takeoff and landing. Once an aircraft is above 10,000 feet, aviation officials say, a flight crew would have enough time and altitude to safely react to any electronic problem. The risk in allowing passengers to use their electronics at lower altitudes is tiny, said Boeing engineer David Carson, but since a freak occurrence could end in disaster, “why take that risk?”

Is there any evidence to support this fear? It’s mostly theoretical. Any electrical device can generate interference as electricity flows through its wiring. Even those without wireless signals, like portable CD players, can emit potentially troublesome electromagnetic radiation. Devices that intentionally transmit radio waves, like cellphones, pose even greater problems. Some engineers think that such emissions could potentially drown out weak signals from radio navigation beacons on the ground or GPS satellites in space. Wireless industry spokesman Michael Altschul says such fears are baseless, since separate radio frequencies are assigned for aviation and commercial use. “Plus,” he said, “the wiring and instruments for aircraft are shielded to protect them from interference from commercial wireless devices.” In two decades of tests, government scientists and experts at Boeing and Airbus have bombarded planes with electromagnetic radiation, but have never succeeded in replicating the problems reported by pilots, or confirmed that electronic devices caused any equipment failure.

Do some fliers ignore the ban? A recent survey found that 40 percent of air passengers didn’t bother to turn their phones off during takeoff or landing; 7 percent left their devices’ Wi-Fi and cellular communications functions active, and 2 percent surreptitiously used their phones to talk or text onboard. University of Illinois psychologist Daniel Simons estimates the odds of all 78 passengers on an average-size U.S. domestic flight powering down their phones completely as “infinitesimal: less than one in 100 quadrillion.” If personal electronics were as dangerous as the FAA rules suggest, “navigation and communication would be disrupted every day on domestic flights,” he said. “But we don’t see that.” In addition, flight crews now freely use iPads in the cockpit instead of bulky paper operating manuals. And above 10,000 feet, many U.S. airlines happily allow passengers to use the Internet via onboard Wi-Fi systems for a fee, with no reports of dangerous interference with airplane avionics.

Will the FAA ever ease up its rules? It’s considering doing just that. As more and more people replace books and magazines with Kindles, iPads, and smartphones, pressure is growing to lift the ban. The FAA announced last year that it would conduct a thorough review of its electronic device policy — but didn’t say when that review would be completed. Sen. Claire McCaskill (D–Mo.) has warned the FAA that if it doesn’t soon relax its rules on e-readers and other portable electronics, she will introduce legislation forcing it to do so. “I’m big on getting rid of regulations that make no sense,” she said, “and I think this is one.”

When might the ban end? Conceivably, within a year, although bureaucracies can move very slowly. Current guidelines require each airline to test every make and model of each electronic device it wants the FAA to approve for each type of aircraft in its fleet. But the FAA is now seeking to bring together airlines, aircraft manufacturers, technology firms, and the Federal Communications Commission to streamline the certification process for tablets, e-readers, and other gadgets, so entire classes of devices could be approved at one time. The ban on using cellphones to make calls or send texts in the air, however, is likely to remain for the foreseeable future.

Why single out cellphones? The trouble there is possible interference with cellular networks, not with aircraft avionics. Cell networks operate on the principle that a cellphone is only within range of one or two cellular towers. A phone that’s moving at 500 mph at 30,000 feet, however, can shower signals on any number of masts, confusing the network’s software and potentially leading to dropped calls between land-based customers. Besides, surveys show that most passengers dread the thought of some jerk in the next seat being free to conduct annoying cellphone conversations from New York to Los Angeles. “An aircraft is one of the few places left on earth where you can actually escape from mobile phones,” said aviation and travel writer Benét Wilson. “I hope it stays that way.”

Sky-high punishments Many passengers ignore the electronics ban in flight, but those who get caught — and remain defiant — can pay a serious price. Actor Alec Baldwin was booted from an American Airlines flight in 2011 after he ignored a flight attendant’s repeated requests that he stop playing a game on his smartphone. Last November, half a dozen police cars raced onto the tarmac and surrounded a plane at New York’s La Guardia Airport as if there were a terrorist onboard. They were there to arrest a 30-year-old passenger who had refused to turn off his phone during taxiing. Scofflaws on foreign flights can risk more than ejection. In 1999, oil worker Neil Whitehouse refused to switch off and hand over his phone to a British Airways flight attendant, earning a year in jail. A Saudi Arabian passenger who flouted the cellphone ban two years later received an even harsher punishment: 70 lashes.


Airlines offer travelers more premium in-flight amenities Business-class amenities are getting more attention from airlines amid growing competition for lucrative corporate demand, this feature says. The latest offering comes from Delta Air Lines, with its upcoming “Westin Heavenly In-Flight Bedding” program developed in partnership with Westin Hotels and Resorts. The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (2/25)


Airline industry is preparing for possible sequester, A4A says Dan Elwell, the senior vice president for safety, security and operations at Airlines for America, commented on the possible sequester, saying, “We have a team that works full time at the national command center of the FAA, and they’re in place for anything that could arise.” The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (2/25)

DELTA NEWSLETTER FEB.18, 2013Monday, February 18, 2013 7:28 AM

 
PRESIDENTS DAY COMES AND GOES  AND MOST AMERICANS THINK NOTHING OF IT.  FIRST INTEREST I EVER GOT ON IT WAS LINCOLNS HOME IN SPRINGFIELD, ILL.  HAVE ALWAYS WANTED TO GO BACK AS HAD ARMY BUDDY FROM THERE. HE AS PASSED ON NOW SO DOUBTFUL THAT TRIP WILL COME ABOUT.
 
ONES ON A CRUISE AT THIS TIME ARE CAROLYN NEUBRAND AND HUSBAND . THEY ARE TAKING   THE SAME ONE WE DID 2 YEARS AGO.  FIRST TIME FOR US IN 75 YEARS.
 
CHUCK AND HIS WIFE ARE ON THE ONE FROM AROUND SOUTH AMERICA AT THIS TIME.  MIKE HAMMER AND HIS WIFE HAVE ONE PLANNED FOR APRIL I BELIVE.
 
DO I HAVE MY STRENGTH BACK YET I AM AFRAID NOT. NEXT DR. IS MARCH 1ST.  MAY TRY IT THEN TO DRIVE BUT RIGHT NOW AM JUST GLAD TO GET OUT OF BED.
 
IT BOTHERS ME TO SOME EXTENT KNOWING THIS WAS TIME OF YEAR THE RATTLESNAKES  START TO LOOK FORWARD TO WARM AND SUNSHINE WEATHER.  I WOULD NOT LAST VERY LONG NOW DOING IT.  (ABOUT 20 FT. OF WALKING IS ALL)
 
I HAVE HAD PEOPLE ASK HOW MANY DELTA FLIGHTS  DOES DELTA HAVE AT THIS  TIME FROM DFW?  I  HAVE NO IDEA SINCE NOT FLOWN FOR SEVERAL YEARS.  IT WAS TO MEM AND BACK GETTING THE LAST 2 SEATS BOTH WAYS .IT JUST TOOK THAT TRIP TO TELL ME THE GOOD OLD DAYS ARE LONG GONE.
 
LAST REPORT FROM THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY IS TOMMY GRECO AND HAP BAAS CROSSING THE RIVER TO OLD MEXICO.  THERE AGAIN IS SOMETHING I COULD NO LONGER DO.  I THINK HOW MANY TIMES WE DID THIS IN THE 2400 MILE STRETCH OF THE BORDER OF MEXICO AND U.S. VERY FEW  CROSSINGS WE HADN’T DONE THIS.  THERE AGAIN MEMORIES TO THINK ABOUT.  NO DESIRE.
 
WHO WOULD THINK TOMMY GRECO WOULD EVER BECOME A RANCHER. HE TAKES CARE OF THE FAMILY RANCH NORTH OF McALLEN,TEX. 20 MILES TO THE NORTH.  I THINK THE COW HERD NUMBERS ARE MUCH LOWER THAN THEY USED TO BE BECAUSE MAINLY BY THE DROUGHT YEARS WHICH  WE ARE IN.
 
THESE ARE THE PEOPLE THAT I KNOW OF THAT ARE IN THE VALLEY FOR THE WINTER:
 
DON SMITHS
HAP BAAS
TOMMY SNOW
JIM HAYNES
(LLOYD HESTERLY HAS MADE IT HIS HOME)  THE NAMES ABOVE ARE FOR PART OF THE WINTER MONTHS. THE CRECO RANCH IS 20 MILES NORTH IN THE RANGE AND CACTUS  LAND.
 
TIME TO MOVE ON AS SITTING IS LIMITED.
 
THE 2ND DAY OF A DIET IS USUALLY EASIER  THAN THE FIRST, AS BY THEN YOU’RE LIKELY TO BE OFF IT.
 
WHEN YOU READ THE FINE PRINT YOU GET AN EDUCATION.  BUT WHEN YOU DON’T,YOU GET EXPERIENCE
 
IT MAY BE THAT A GOOD LISTENER IS JUST THINKING OF SOMETHING ELSE.
 
A SUCESSFUL MAN IS ONE WHO CAN LAY A FIRM FOUDATION WITH THE BRICKS OTHERS HAVE THROWN AT HIM
 
NO WINTER LASTS FOREVER, NO SPRING SKIPS ITS TURN.  APRIL IS A PROMISE THAT MAY IS BOUND  TO KEEP, AND WE KNOW IT.
 
WHAT DO YOU GET FOR SOMONE WHO HAS IT ALL???? ANTIBIOTICS
 
DELTA VAN
 
P.S.  YOU  WANT TO GET SENIOR PRINT.HOW  ABOUT THIS.
                                                  OR THIS
                                                                                     OR THIS
 
 
 
 

Norman Vanlaningham

 

Delta & Industry news

What Happens If You Become Seriously Ill During a Flight
If you fly on commercial airlines in the United States and have ever wondered what would happen in the event of a medical emergency, especially if the carrier works in conjunction with physicians on the ground, you should feel more reassured after learning what I found from one airline.

I fly about 150,000 miles a year, primarily on Delta Air Lines, and had a chance to visit with a number of senior crewmembers and pilots, and read the relevant sections about in-flight medical emergencies. I learned about what they do when a passenger becomes ill or suffer a heart attack or other life-threatening event while flying.

I wrote an article last year about an oxygen system failure aboard a Delta flight I was on, and briefly touched upon the role of flight attendants during an emergency. After reading the Delta procedures for crewmembers, there is no question that the primary job of a flight attendant is all about safety and helping passengers in a medical crisis. Their other tasks are secondary.

I shared some of the information I learned from Delta Air Lines with Dr. Tom Stys, Director of the Sanford Cardiovascular Institute in Sioux Falls. What I found was actually quite amazing and encouraging for all passengers that fly this airline. Delta’s procedures are similar to those in effect by all other U.S. carriers.

Delta Air Lines, as well as many other carriers, contract with the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center for their STAT-MD program for immediate medical consultation when they have a problem during a flight. UPMC offers the same kind of service to the airline industry as does another major player, MedAire.

These providers insure that medical events are properly analyzed while they are occurring so that passengers have the best chance of survival, should the emergency be life-threatening.

More passengers are flying, which means more medical emergencies onboard that can result in serious ramifications, including death. It is estimated the almost six million people travel onboard commercial aircraft every day throughout the world. Passengers are living longer, which equates to having a higher likelihood of recurring medical conditions which can manifest themselves during a journey. Longer flights, larger capacity aircraft and more passengers with underlying health issues all contribute to a growing problem for airline companies.

Unexpected, but planned-for medical emergencies include heart attacks, strokes, choking, diabetic reactions, seizures, and other maladies. Real incidents do happen, and more often than you would think, as reported in the New York Times in May, 2011.

Passengers And Medical Problems

Passengers can be classified in three groups in the context of medical events: those that have unknown conditions; predisposed conditions which are triggered as the result of travel; and known conditions which include those passengers that became ill at their destination and are trying to return home, are securing more appropriate or less expensive treatment, or are literally flying home to die.

There is a technical communications problem when Delta or other carriers communicate with the UPMC STAT-MD or other ground-based doctors during an emergency. There is no direct link between a flight attendant or physician onboard in the cabin and the hospital because evidently it is too complicated to tie the intercom system on the aircraft with the internal company radio system or satellite phone onboard so that instructions do not have to be relayed from the flight crew to the one that is treating the passenger. A spokesman for Delta confirmed this issue but said it has not posed any problems for them.

Security concerns in the U.S. prevent direct communications between a doctor onboard and the airline dispatch facility and medical staff because nobody can enter the flight deck to speak directly to the ground. There is also a new security directive that prevents the Captain from leaving the cockpit to assist a patient or flight attendants because of the potential to create a medical emergency as a diversion for hijackers.

The Doctors On The Ground That Can Help You

I interviewed Dr. Paulo Alves, Medical Director of MedAire, about what they do and his extensive experience in the specialty of aeronautical medicine. His company has been in business for twenty five years and is one of the leading providers of remote medical consultation and care for flights, whether the passengers or crew are on the ground or in the air. They provide an integrated system with airline crews to make sure that everyone is on the same page as to the latest technology, techniques, medical trends and regulations.

The company oversees training, and equipment provisioning to sixty airlines throughout the world. They have a Global Response and Dispatch center in Phoenix that handled 22,000 cases last year, and assisted with 12,000 medical fit-to-fly assessments of passengers at the boarding gate, and 5,000 cases of airline crew members that had medical issues during layovers.

The company works with airlines to help protect passengers and crew in case of two different scenarios: a medical event, or a potentially life-threatening emergency.

The University of Pittsburgh STAT-MD program is similar to MedAire, but was initially designed to serve Western Pennsylvania to support emergency medical services. UPMC has one of the finest emergency medicine curriculums in the country, so it is natural that airlines also utilize their expertise.

Telemedicine And The Airline Industry In The U.S.

According to MedAire the U.S. carriers do not have telemedicine capabilities as yet, while five different carriers in Europe do. Even though many aircraft now have WiFi they don’t use it for medical emergencies, but they all have voice links via satellite phones, company frequencies, or Airinc, which is a national aeronautical radio link for air transport.

Technology really has not caught up with the airline industry. While the FDA just approved a cardiac monitor for use with an iPhone last week, such technology is not available on aircraft even thought it could be.


Column: American should look to Delta/Northwest merger Columnist Mitchell Schnurman writes that the Delta Air Lines/Northwest Airlines merger should be an example of how to proceed for American Airlines. “Delta executed well, especially in blending technology from Northwest and in keeping employee morale high,” he writes. “Executives and pilots also sidestepped a potential minefield by agreeing to a labor contract before the merger closed.” The Dallas Morning News (free content) (1/28)

Delta to add first-ever outdoor terraces to Sky Clubs Delta Air Lines plans to add outdoor terraces with runway views to its Sky Clubs at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport and John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York, the company said Monday. The carrier worked with Architectural Digest to develop the designs for the terraces, which are scheduled to open in late spring and summer. American City Business Journals/Atlanta (1/28), The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (1/28)


Column: Travelers can choose more bundles for airline perks Columnist Scott McCartney walks travelers through the various bundles offered by U.S. airlines for the best deals. “Borrowing a marketing practice from auto makers, phone companies and others, airlines are moving quickly to bundle options in packages designed to get customers to spend more,” writes McCartney. The Wall Street Journal (1/30)


Delta gets 44,000 applications for flight attendant jobs 
For an on-the-fly read of the economy, check out the volume of job applications for flight attendant positions at Delta Air Lines. Some 44,000 people applied for about 400 flight attendant jobs at the airline, Delta chief executive Richard Anderson told employees. That means the odds of getting a position are about 1 in 110. The airline also had 6,000 employee referrals.

In 2010, Atlanta-based Delta received more than 100,000 applications for about 1,000 flight flight attendant positions. The airline is about to start interviewing candidates for the positions. Its own flight attendants serve on panels to screen and select the new hires.


Delta improved key measure in January Passenger revenue per available seat mile for Delta Air Lines increased by 5.5% in January on a year-over-year basis, a key measure of airline profitability. Forbes/Logistics & Transportation blog (2/4), The Commercial Appeal (Memphis, Tenn.) (free registration)/The Associated Press (2/4)

Delta Air Lines to expand service in LAX, Seattle Delta Air Lines plans to add daily service to San Jose, Calif., from Los Angeles International Airport. Delta also will expand flights to four other cities from LAX. Meanwhile, the carrier received approval from the Department of Transportation for a new route from Seattle to Tokyo. “We would like to thank the DOT for approval of our new service between Seattle and Haneda,” said Delta CEO Richard Anderson in a statement. “Delta’s new flights will significantly benefit consumers in the region as well as boost the economy and create jobs by opening new doors for commerce with Asia.” USA Today/Today In The Sky blog (2/6), American City Business Journals/Seattle (2/5), American City Business Journals/Atlanta (2/5), FlightGlobal.com (U.K.) (2/5)


Atlanta remains home to world’s busiest airport Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport remained the world’s busiest airport in 2012 in terms of passengers and operations. The airport set a record for passenger traffic with 95.5 million passengers in 2012. The Oregonian (Portland)/The Associated Press (2/5)


TSA demonstrates security program at Fla. airport The Transportation Security Administration demonstrated a new security program at Tampa International Airport in Florida this week. The “managed inclusion” program includes the use of four detection dogs. The TSA said the program was part of its transition to risk-based security. Tampa Bay Times (St. Petersburg, Fla.) (2/6)


Airlines enhance the travel experience at airports Airport upgrades around the world have widened passengers’ options between flights. Delta Air Lines has invested in amenities such as iPads at its terminals, and has added high-class restaurants. Incheon Airport in Seoul, Korea, offers an ice-skating rink, while Changi Airport in Singapore offers free gaming rooms and a 24-hour movie theater. CNN (2/6)


Delta plans rates increase for lounge memberships Delta Air Lines has announced that it will raise annual rates for most lounge memberships beginning 1 March. Rates for individual membership from the Silver Medallion through the Diamond Medallion tiers will rise by $50. CNBC/Road Warrior blog (2/6)
 

 

DELTA CLIPPED WINGS….

 

 

FROM THE DELTA CLIPPED WINGS….
1/5 from Betty Lesane … As you may know, my husband, Jimmy passed away Friday morning at Good Shepard Hospice House in Sebring.
Services will be on Monday, the 7th, at First Baptist Church Lake Placid.  Visitation at 1:00, service at 2:00 with refreshments following in the Fellowship Hall.
Thank you for all of your prayers during Jimmy 14 year ordeal.  God has been so good to both of us through it all!  He is just fine now!
There is a web site: www.scottfuneralservices.com that will have (maybe by this afternoon) his obit.
Address: 302 Sirena Drive, Lake Placid, FL 33852 ~ bles@embarqmail.com (FA class 05-14-62)

1/22 from Whitney Purinton, Janice Ordway’s daughter … Many of you have followed my Mom’s breast cancer journey over the last 9 years.  She has fought an incredibly hard and uphill battle.  Over the last several weeks, it has become increasingly difficult for her to breathe.  After two recent hospital stays, we have decided it is time to bring in home hospice.  Please continue to keep our family in your prayers.
Thanks for keeping in touch.  I will try to keep you posted as things change, but please don’t hesitate to email.  Cards are still appreciated, but no phone calls right now.  She’s just too tired.
Address: 204 Charon Way, Peachtree City, GA 30269 ~ janiceordway@hotmail.com (FA class 06/01/70)


1/19 from Betty Turner Lesane … Would you be so kind to thank all of the many who took the time to send cards, emails and posts on Facebook, expressing their thoughts and prayers and condolences to me for the passing of my husband, Jimmy.  I have been humbled by each of those.  It has been so special to me that you took time to show your caring and concern.  Hugs to each of you.


1/30 … Shay Paris (Roland) Frohn passed away suddenly on Saturday January 26, 2013.  Shay was hired by Delta in the early 70’s and flew out of Atlanta before transferring to Cincinnati where she was a Flight Attendant and Supervisor prior to her retirement.
Below is the information that was shared by all who were shocked by her sudden loss.  She and Joe had a lake home in Perry Park, about 50 minutes south of their home in Northern KY.  Shay was there when she became extremely ill.
Condolences may be sent to Mr. Joe Frohn,53 Dudley Road, Edgewood, Kentucky 41017
Details regarding her service on Friday, February 1st, can be found on this link: www.legacy.com/obituaries/nky/obituary.aspx?n=shay-a-frohn&pid=162713983#fbLoggedOut
“Shay had been fighting flu symptoms on and off for about ten days, but nothing too serious.   A neighbor at Perry Park stopped by with some soup for her Friday, then came back later in the afternoon to make sure she had eaten it.   She had not, so the neighbor called Joe (he was at their house in Edgewood).
After talking to Shay he could tell she just wasn’t herself and asked the neighbor to call 911.  On the way to the Carrollton Hospital, Shay lost consciousness.  Once they got to the hospital, they immediately airlifted her to UC.  Shay never regained consciousness.
Joe and Debbie arrived at UC and spent the evening there.  The doctors sent them home around 2:00 a.m. Saturday morning, believing she was stable.  Joe got a call at 7:00 a.m. to come to the hospital right away.  When Joe and Debbie arrived, Shay had already passed away.  The flu had turned to pneumonia and then got into her bloodstream (Sepsis – septic shock) which is what took her so quickly.  Ironically, Shay was one who never got a flu shot, but this year she did.”
Obituary
Shay A. Frohn, age 63 of Edgewood passed away on January 26, 2013.  She was the loving wife of Joe Frohn.  Beloved daughter of Margie Ann Paris.  Dear sister of Lynn Bates, Ray Paris, and Bill Paris.
Visitation Friday from 10 am to 12 pm at MIDDENDORF FUNERAL HOME, FT. WRIGHT.  Service to follow at 12 pm.
Memorials are suggested to: Kenton County Animal Shelter, 1020 Mary Laidley Drive, Ft. Mitchell, KY 41017 or Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, 175 Ammon Drive Suite 201, Manchester, NH 03103.  Online Condolences may be sent to: http://middendorf-funeralhome.com/sitemaker/sites/MIDDEN1/obit.cgi?user=888739Frohn


1/31 from Kathy Dillard Horner … I wanted you to know I have breast cancer, but it has been found very early.  I found the lump thank goodness because I have the kind that doesn’t show up in a mammogram which we didn’t know until now.
Breast cancer runs in my family as my Mom was one of 5 girls, 4 of which had breast cancer including my Mom.  I have been having lumps (non-malignant) removed since I was nineteen so have always felt it was just a matter of time so am relieved it is finally here and found so early.
The mass is only 1.4cm which, according to my doctor, is about as small as it can be to be detected.  Because of the type of cancer, my history and family history I will have a double mastectomy on February 26.
I am very lucky it was found so early and to have such a great medical team. I don’t know yet about chemo and won’t know that until the surgery is done.   I feel like God is sitting on my shoulder so all will be well.  He has something important for me to do, so not worried at all now that I have had a little time to digest it all.
Both of my boys will be here for the surgery. When they leave Jenny and Jackie will move in as long as I need someone here. Delta Clipped Wings will take care of meals and transportation until I can drive so I’m totally covered as far as help is concerned.  I am also on about 6 church prayer groups, so at this point all I need from you is prayers … can’t have too many you know.
The doctors said to plan on 2 to 3 days in hospital which will be Piedmont in Atlanta.  About a week total laying around and then back to pretty normal activities except I don’t know about driving and I know lifting will be limited for a while.  I will have 2 additional surgeries to complete reconstruction, but they can be planned at my convenience.
Lots of Love and God Bless to you all.
NOTE: Kathy has requested no calls or visitors at the hospital as she will be heavily sedated.
Address: 4517 Lashley Court, Marietta, GA 30068 ~ dillardhorner@bellsouth.net (FA class 09/02/69)

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